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Admire the Royal Residence of Balmoral Castle

Balmoral Castle located in 9 miles from Ballater and less than an hour from the Royal Arch Riverside Park. The Balmoral Castle estate is a popular attraction off guests staying at the Royal Arch Riverside Park.


Balmoral Castle is a royal residence located in Aberdeenshire, Scotland. The castle has a long and rich history, having served as a summer home for several generations of the British royal family.


Deer standing in front of Balmoral Castle Estate in, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

Balmoral Castle history


The estate was originally purchased by Queen Victoria and Prince Albert in 1852 as a summer home and a place to escape from the rigors of royal life. The original castle was a simple mansion, but over time, it was expanded and improved upon, eventually becoming the grand residence that it is today.


Queen Victoria was particularly fond of Balmoral and spent many happy summers there with her family. She was deeply connected to the Scottish landscape and culture, and was instrumental in promoting the revival of traditional Scottish crafts and industries, such as tweed weaving and tartan design.


The castle's design reflects the Victorian Gothic style that was popular at the time, with intricate stonework and a steeply pitched roof. It is surrounded by beautiful gardens, including a large rock garden, a famous rhododendron garden, and a formal rose garden.

One of the most distinctive features of Balmoral is its stunning location in the midst of the Scottish countryside. The estate covers over 50,000 acres and encompasses a wide range of natural landscapes, including forests, moors, and rolling hills. This has made it a popular destination for outdoor enthusiasts, who come to enjoy the beautiful scenery, hike and cycle the many trails, and fish in the nearby rivers.


During the 20th century, Balmoral castle continued to serve as a summer home for several generations of the British royal family, including King Edward VII, King George V, and Queen Elizabeth II. The castle remains an important part of the British royal family's history and is a symbol of their connection to Scotland and its people.


Today, Balmoral is open to the public during the summer months, and visitors are welcome to tour the castle and its grounds. The castle's interiors are notable for their ornate Victorian decor, and visitors can see the magnificent stained glass windows, hand-carved wooden paneling, and elaborate furnishings that reflect the taste of the Victorian era.

In addition to the castle itself, visitors can also tour the estate's gardens, which are renowned for their beauty and diversity. The rhododendron garden is particularly famous, and visitors come from all over the world to see the hundreds of different species of rhododendrons and azaleas that bloom each spring.


Balmoral Castle is not just a beautiful residence, but also a symbol of Scotland's history and heritage. It has served as a summer home for generations of the British royal family, and continues to be a source of pride for the Scottish people. Whether you are a fan of the British royal family or simply a lover of history and architecture, Balmoral Castle is a must-see destination for anyone visiting Scotland.


Despite these modernisations, Balmoral remains a symbol of tradition and history. The castle continues to be a popular destination for tourists, who come to see the stunning Victorian Gothic architecture and learn about the rich history of the British royal family.

Queen Elizabeth II had a deep personal connection to Balmoral, and she has played a significant role in preserving and promoting its heritage. During her reign, she has overseen numerous conservation projects, including the restoration of the castle's gardens and the preservation of the surrounding landscape.




Queen Elizabeth II dressed in Scottish Tartan

Queen Elizabeth II Balmoral Castle


Queen Elizabeth II has a strong fondness for Balmoral Castle, and it has been a beloved residence for her throughout her life. She first visited the castle as a young princess in the 1930s, and it holds many fond memories for her.


The castle is located in the midst of the beautiful Scottish countryside, and Queen Elizabeth II is known to be particularly fond of its stunning landscapes and tranquil surroundings. She is an avid outdoors enthusiast, and she enjoys walks and picnics in the estate's forests and hills.


In addition to its beautiful surroundings, Balmoral is also notable for its Victorian Gothic architecture and ornate interiors. Queen Elizabeth II is said to appreciate the castle's historical significance and its connection to her family's heritage.


Each summer, Queen Elizabeth II retreats to Balmoral to escape the rigors of royal life and enjoy some rest and relaxation. The castle is a place of comfort and familiarity for her, and it is a home away from home.


Despite its remote location, Balmoral is a hub of activity during the summer months, and the royal family often entertain guests and host events at the castle. Queen Elizabeth II is known for her warm and welcoming hospitality, and she has hosted many dignitaries and heads of state at Balmoral over the years. Many who Visit Scotland have Balmoral castle on their list of places to visit in Scotland.


In short, Balmoral Castle holds a special place in Queen Elizabeth II's heart, and she has a deep connection to the estate and its history. It is a cherished residence that continues to play an important role in her life and in the life of the British royal family.


In the modern era, Balmoral Castle has undergone extensive renovations and upgrades to maintain its status as a royal residence. During the 1950s and 1960s, the castle was expanded to accommodate the growing royal family, and new facilities such as a swimming pool and tennis court were added. In the 21st century, the castle has undergone further renovations to update its infrastructure and ensure that it remains comfortable and functional for the royal family.

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